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Vintage BROWN-SALTMAN VAN KEPPEL-GREEN Door Dresser with Mirror

$3,900.00
Vintage dresser by Brown-Saltman designed by Van Keppel-Green has a silhouette that is quintessential mid century modern. Dual doors, each with dual panels, are double hinged and open to reveal eight large drawers. A protective glass top and a rectangular mirror top the dresser.  A bracket style base elevates the chest.  Matching pieces available, sold separately. About the Manufacturer: Brown-Saltman Furniture was created from collaboration between designer Paul Frankl and furniture manufacturer David Saltman. Frankl rose to fame in the 1930s with beloved rattan furniture, also becoming known for his Art Deco furniture that evoked a city skyline. Saltman was based in Los Angeles and specialized in furniture reproductions at the time of the pair’s chance meeting. Saltman asked Frankl to collaborate on a furniture line which was released in 1941, exceeding expectations and becoming a categorical hit. The two simplified the designs and prepared for mass production, which was an even bigger success than the initial line. In 1942, Frankl and Saltman signed a contract for continuation of their collaboration. Tragedy struck the very next day as Saltman was killed in a car accident. World War II disrupted production shortly thereafter, and Brown-Saltman dissolved by 1960. Other prominent designers, such as Paul Laszlo and Van Keppel-Green, also were a part of the Brown-Saltman story.  A sideboard was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s Good Design exhibition in 1950, helping solidify their legacy. Van Keppel-Green was an industrial design firm founded by Hendrik Van Keppel and Taylor Green, both California natives born in 1914. VKG, as they were known, was a pivotal part of the then-revolutionary concept of indoor/outdoor furniture, with the rising popularity of blending indoor and outdoor spaces in architecture. VKG focused on the needs of the people, and emphasized custom products to ensure that all needs were met. The pair was quite inventive, coming before many iconic designers who replicated some of their more impactful concepts. VKG was at the forefront of the “clean line” frontier, and a commonly forgotten part of truly revolutionary furniture design.  The convergence of these forces represents the modernization and industrialization of furniture design and manufacturing in the mid 20th century. Although certainly replicated, these pieces of furniture and the minds that created them could be considered the blueprint for clean lined, modern home furniture. This dresser is amongst hundreds of pieces of furniture that are available at our location in Grandview! Come in today and see the full collection.  

Vintage BROWN-SALTMAN VAN KEPPEL-GREEN Four Drawer Chest

$2,200.00
Vintage chest by Brown-Saltman designed by Van Keppel-Green has a silhouette that is quintessential mid century modern. Four wide, unembellished drawers fit neatly within the frame. A bracket style base elevates the chest.  Matching pieces available, sold separately. About the Manufacturer: Brown-Saltman Furniture was created from collaboration between designer Paul Frankl and furniture manufacturer David Saltman. Frankl rose to fame in the 1930s with beloved rattan furniture, also becoming known for his Art Deco furniture that evoked a city skyline. Saltman was based in Los Angeles and specialized in furniture reproductions at the time of the pair’s chance meeting. Saltman asked Frankl to collaborate on a furniture line which was released in 1941, exceeding expectations and becoming a categorical hit. The two simplified the designs and prepared for mass production, which was an even bigger success than the initial line. In 1942, Frankl and Saltman signed a contract for continuation of their collaboration. Tragedy struck the very next day as Saltman was killed in a car accident. World War II disrupted production shortly thereafter, and Brown-Saltman dissolved by 1960. Other prominent designers, such as Paul Laszlo and Van Keppel-Green, also were a part of the Brown-Saltman story.  A sideboard was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s Good Design exhibition in 1950, helping solidify their legacy. Van Keppel-Green was an industrial design firm founded by Hendrik Van Keppel and Taylor Green, both California natives born in 1914. VKG, as they were known, was a pivotal part of the then-revolutionary concept of indoor/outdoor furniture, with the rising popularity of blending indoor and outdoor spaces in architecture.VKG focused on the needs of the people, and emphasized custom products to ensure that all needs were met. The pair was quite inventive, coming before many iconic designers who replicated some of their more impactful concepts. VKG was at the forefront of the “clean line” frontier, and a commonly forgotten part of truly revolutionary furniture design.  The convergence of these forces represents the modernization and industrialization of furniture design and manufacturing in the mid 20th century. Although certainly replicated, these pieces of furniture and the minds that created them could be considered the blueprint for clean lined, modern home furniture. This chest is amongst hundreds of pieces of furniture that are available at our location in Grandview! Come in today and see the full collection.  

Vintage BROWN-SALTMAN VAN KEPPEL-GREEN Five Drawer Chest

$2,500.00
Vintage chest by Brown-Saltman designed by Van Keppel-Green has a silhouette that is quintessential mid century modern. Five wide, unembellished drawers fit neatly within the frame. A bracket style base elevates the chest.  Matching pieces available, sold separately. About the Manufacturer: Brown-Saltman Furniture was created from collaboration between designer Paul Frankl and furniture manufacturer David Saltman. Frankl rose to fame in the 1930s with beloved rattan furniture, also becoming known for his Art Deco furniture that evoked a city skyline. Saltman was based in Los Angeles and specialized in furniture reproductions at the time of the pair’s chance meeting. Saltman asked Frankl to collaborate on a furniture line which was released in 1941, exceeding expectations and becoming a categorical hit. The two simplified the designs and prepared for mass production, which was an even bigger success than the initial line. In 1942, Frankl and Saltman signed a contract for continuation of their collaboration. Tragedy struck the very next day as Saltman was killed in a car accident. World War II disrupted production shortly thereafter, and Brown-Saltman dissolved by 1960. Other prominent designers, such as Paul Laszlo and Van Keppel-Green, also were a part of the Brown-Saltman story.  A sideboard was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s Good Design exhibition in 1950, helping solidify their legacy. Van Keppel-Green was an industrial design firm founded by Hendrik Van Keppel and Taylor Green, both California natives born in 1914. VKG, as they were known, was a pivotal part of the then-revolutionary concept of indoor/outdoor furniture, with the rising popularity of blending indoor and outdoor spaces in architecture.VKG focused on the needs of the people, and emphasized custom products to ensure that all needs were met. The pair was quite inventive, coming before many iconic designers who replicated some of their more impactful concepts. VKG was at the forefront of the “clean line” frontier, and a commonly forgotten part of truly revolutionary furniture design.  The convergence of these forces represents the modernization and industrialization of furniture design and manufacturing in the mid 20th century. Although certainly replicated, these pieces of furniture and the minds that created them could be considered the blueprint for clean lined, modern home furniture. This chest is amongst hundreds of pieces of furniture that are available at our location in Grandview! Come in today and see the full collection.  

Vintage BROWN-SALTMAN VAN KEPPEL-GREEN Nightstand

$900.00
Vintage nightstand by Brown-Saltman designed by Van Keppel-Green has a silhouette that is quintessential mid century modern. A single unembellished drawer is positioned above a single shelf. Slab legs elevate the nightstand.  Matching pieces available, sold separately. About the Manufacturer: Brown-Saltman Furniture was created from collaboration between designer Paul Frankl and furniture manufacturer David Saltman. Frankl rose to fame in the 1930s with beloved rattan furniture, also becoming known for his Art Deco furniture that evoked a city skyline. Saltman was based in Los Angeles and specialized in furniture reproductions at the time of the pair’s chance meeting. Saltman asked Frankl to collaborate on a furniture line which was released in 1941, exceeding expectations and becoming a categorical hit. The two simplified the designs and prepared for mass production, which was an even bigger success than the initial line. In 1942, Frankl and Saltman signed a contract for continuation of their collaboration. Tragedy struck the very next day as Saltman was killed in a car accident. World War II disrupted production shortly thereafter, and Brown-Saltman dissolved by 1960. Other prominent designers, such as Paul Laszlo and Van Keppel-Green, also were a part of the Brown-Saltman story.  A sideboard was featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s Good Design exhibition in 1950, helping solidify their legacy. Van Keppel-Green was an industrial design firm founded by Hendrik Van Keppel and Taylor Green, both California natives born in 1914. VKG, as they were known, was a pivotal part of the then-revolutionary concept of indoor/outdoor furniture, with the rising popularity of blending indoor and outdoor spaces in architecture.VKG focused on the needs of the people, and emphasized custom products to ensure that all needs were met. The pair was quite inventive, coming before many iconic designers who replicated some of their more impactful concepts. VKG was at the forefront of the “clean line” frontier, and a commonly forgotten part of truly revolutionary furniture design.  The convergence of these forces represents the modernization and industrialization of furniture design and manufacturing in the mid 20th century. Although certainly replicated, these pieces of furniture and the minds that created them could be considered the blueprint for clean lined, modern home furniture. This nightstand is amongst hundreds of pieces of furniture that are available at our location in Grandview! Come in today and see the full collection.