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Antique French Inlaid Lift Top Bar Cabinet

$2,950.00
Antique French lift top cabinet or bar is decadently inlaid throughout with a rich, warm finish. The top lifts up and rests on two stops on the back of the piece. Two shelves on the lifting back, along with their folding supports, are decorated with inlay. Each side has a similarly styled slide out shelf. The supports on the back have remnants of shoulder straps. The previous owner believed the cabinet would be transported out into the field for officers during the early French wars circa the early 1800s. This cabinet is amongst hundreds of antiques that are available at our showroom in Grandview! Come in today and see the full collection.  

Italian Inlaid Pedestal Table

SOLD
Eye-catching Italian pedestal table has a round top with an organically tessellated top and a flourished, contrasting border. A pedestal base has turned details and three scrolled legs. A medium tone finish adds to the classic look of this piece.  This table is amongst hundreds of pieces of decor that are available at our showroom in Grandview! Come in today and see the full collection.  

Pair of Antique 18th Century Mahogany Knife Boxes

$4,500.00
Pair of 18th century knife boxes are made from traditional mahogany with burled veneers and inlaid trim. Angled, hinged lids open to reveal an inlaid star with additional inlaid detail. Eight vertical slots with inlaid edges are designed for tip-down knife storage. Keyholes for the locks have decorative escutcheons. Subtle feet elevate the pair.  From a 1986 Los Angeles Times article discussing 18th century knife boxes: “Knives, forks and spoons were expensive status symbols in the early 18th-Century home. Few families could afford flatware for a large group. By the end of the 1800s silverware had become available to the upper middle class, and special boxes were made to display and protect the valuable silver properly. Knife boxes were made in the Sheraton or Hepplewhite style to match the furniture designs of the day. Knives were kept in tall boxes, the point of the blade down, and there were partitions to keep the knives from bumping, scratching or dulling the blade… Most knife boxes were made in pairs so one could be placed at each end of the dining room sideboard.” This pair is amongst hundreds of antiques that are available at our showroom in Grandview! Come in today and see the full collection.